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Digital Projects

Projects In-Progress

An image of a woman's hand holding a plant taken from the Caribbean Women Healers project
Research image from the Caribbean Women Healers project

Caribbean Women Healers: Decolonizing Knowledge Within Afro-Indigenous Traditions (2020)

Caribbean Women Healers is a collaborative research project developed and lead by Professor Ana-Maurine Lara and Professor Alaí Reyes Santos. Since 2016 they have conducted ethnographic research with women healers in the Caribbean and the quickly expanding Caribbean diaspora in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Sponsored by UO Libraries Digital Scholarship Center’s Faculty Grants Program. 

This project is in progress and will showcase video and audio oral histories along with a map visualization and an ethnobotanical dictionary. You can follow along with our development process by visiting the Digital Scholarship Team’s how did it get made website.

Project Contributions Showcase

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene, Oregon, Daoist Priest’s Robe (Jiangyi) with Four-Clawed Dragon Rondel Design, Qing dynasty (circa 1850-1900), MWCH45:1.

The Artful Fabric of Collecting (2019)

A digital exhibition showcasing Gertrude Bass Warner’s fabulous collection of Chinese textiles in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. Users can zoom into high-resolution images of richly embroidered garments and hangings. Vision for The Artful Fabric of Collecting was led by Professor Ina Asim and co-sponsored by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the University of Oregon Libraries, with generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. View the project summary.

Red Thread: A Journey Through Color logo
Cropped page from Privilegia et documenta ad monasterium S. Zenonius Maiorii Veronae, 16th century, Edward Burgess manuscript collection 030, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon. MS 30.

Red Thread: A Journey Through Color (2019)

A digital exhibit guide to the global journey traveled by red, from ochre to cochineal, and glass to coral. Student interpretations of objects from across campus collections, scholarly contextualization, map visualization, and suggested teaching and research resources will help you follow the thread. The Red Thread digital exhibit’s visions was led by Professor Vera Keller and sponsored by UO Libraries Digital Scholarship Center’s Faculty Grants Program. Technologies used: Omeka S, StoryMapJS.

Eight senjafuda from a series representing souls and ogres in hell, Gertrude Bass Warner Memorial Library, Japanese Art, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

Yōkai Senjafuda (2019)

 A digital exhibition about ghosts and monsters in Japanese votive prints. Users can learn about the social worlds of printmakers and collectors and meet the ogres, demons, and magical creatures that haunt the UO’s world-class collection of senjafuda. Vision for Yōkai Senjafudawas led by Professor Glynne Walley and co-sponsored by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the University of Oregon Libraries, with generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Technology used: Omeka S. View the project summary.

Two marchers survey the US Capitol. Still from The March (1964) by James Blue.
Two marchers survey the US Capitol. Still from The March (1964) by James Blue.

The March (2019)

A is a digital exhibition about James Blue’s documentary film on the 1963 March on Washington. Users can explore the film’s history and meaning through archival documents, interviews, Oval Office recordings, and more. Vision for The March was led by Professor David A. Frank and co-sponsored by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the University of Oregon Libraries, with generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Technologies used: WordPress, Oral History Metadata Synchronizer. View the project summary.

A meeting of the University of Oregon Black Student Union
Black Student Union: A meeting of the Black Student Union ~ Source: Oregon Digital – University of Oregon Special Collections and University Archives, UA Ref 3. Date: April 1, 1974

Untold Stories: The Hidden History of the University of Oregon (2018)

A digital exhibit telling the untold historical stories of underserved and underrepresented communities on the UO campus. Sponsored by the University of Oregon Libraries and collaboratively built through the UO Libraries Digital Scholarship Center. The vision for the project was lead by Jennifer O’Neal, University Historian and Archivist. Technologies used: Omeka Classic and Curatescape

Public Health in Oregon logo
Image from the Public Health in Oregon Discovering Historical Data website

Public Health in Oregon: Discovering Historical Data (2017)

A digital collection and exhibit about the development of Public Health services in Oregon and of OHSU Library’s work to improve access to public health data held in its unique historical collections. Since the mid-nineteenth century, public health professionals have collected data about large populations to understand problems and make changes that improve people’s lives. A wealth of historical data on public health is found in OHSU Library, particularly its Historical Collections & Archives, which contain original studies, surveys, reports, and other records of public health in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Taking In (2016)

A digital collection capturing over 10 years of Lesley University’s College of Art and Design (formerly the Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University) student publication Taking-In, a professional portfolio representing the quality work fine art and documentary photography created by students at the university.